BYOINSEN



(Hospital Ship by Takeshi Yuki scanned from "Color Paintings of Japanese Warships")

IJN Hospital Ship KIKU MARU:
Tabular Record of Movement

© 2008-2017 Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall.

Revision 2


12 January 1929:
Kobe. Laid down at Mitsubishi Shipbuilding as a 759-ton passenger ship for the Tokiowan Kisen K. K. (Tokyo Bay Steam Ship Co.)

27 April 1929:
Launched and named KIKU MARU.

25 June 1929:
Completed.

1 July 1929:
Begins Tokyo coastal islands service.

1929:
Departs Tokyo. Arrives at Izu-Oshima Island, then steams to Shimoda on Tokiowan Kisen’s route.

24 August 1935:
Tokyo Bay. Runs aground near Kisarazu port.

5 November 1938:
Nisshin Kisen K.K. charters KIKU MARU to the Imperial Army for use as a hospital ship on the Yangtze River.

10 August 1941:
Requisitioned by the IJN.

12 September 1941:
Registered as a specially installed netlayer in the Yokosuka Naval District. Begins conversion at Yokosuka Navy Yard.

15 October 1941:
The conversion is completed. Assigned to the Ominato Guard Unit.

1 December 1941:
Reassigned to the Tsugaru Guard Unit.

15 December 1941-17 September 1942:
Makes frequent short patrols out of Ominato, then returns to port.

28 August 1942:
Transferred to new owner Tokai Kisen K. K.

25 September 1942:
Departs Ominato.

2 October 1942:
Arrives at Muroran, Hokkaido.

4 October – 29 June 1943:
Makes frequent short patrols out of Muroran, then returns to port.

22 March 1943:
Assists cargo ship MANJU MARU torpedoed and damaged the previous day at 41 -37N, 142-30E by LtCdr (later Rear Admiral-Ret) Walter G. Ebert’s USS SCAMP (SS-277).

1943:
Captain Kusegawa Shinji assumes command.

1 July 1943:
Departs Muroran.

31 July 1943:
Arrives Muroran.

25 Augusat 1943:
Departs Muroran.

6 September 1943:
Rescues survivors of cargo ship SHOGEN MARU torpedoed and sunk that day at 42-13N, 142-00E by LtCdr (later Admiral) Ignatius J. Galantin’s USS HALIBUT (SS-232).

10 October 1943:
Escorts a convoy from Manila, Philippines.

12 October 1943:
Arrives at Iloilo, Philippines.

18 October 1943:
Arrives Cebu, Philippines.

31 October 1943:
Arrives at Muroran.

4 November 1943:
Departs Muroran escorting a convoy.

30 January 1944:
Returns to Muroran.

3 February 1944:
Departs Muroran.

27 March 1944:
Arrives Muroran.

1 April 1944:
Departs Muroran on an anti-submarine sweep.

28 April 1944:
Returns to Muroran.

1 May 1944:
Departs Muroran.

24 May 1944:
Arrives at Muroran.

2 June 1944:
Departs Muroran.

29 June 1944:
Arrives Muroran.

5 July 1944:
Departs Muroran.

10 August 1944:
Arrives at Ominato.

5 September 1944:
Departs Ominato.

1 October 1944:
Departs Keelung in special convoy “Taka-Rinji”.

6 October 1944:
Arrives at Naha, Okinawa.

19 October 1944:
Departs Naha carrying 452 aircrew and 300 others.

12 December 1944:
Arrives at Yokosuka.

18 January 1945:
The Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as required by the Geneva Convention, notifies the warring countries that KIKU MARU is a designated hospital ship.

20 January 1945:
KIKU MARU is relieved of assignment in the Ominato Guard Unit and registered as a specially installed hospital ship in the Yokosuka Naval District. Assigned to the Combined Fleet’s 22nd Squadron.

Janauary 1945:
Yokohama. Begins conversion at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries shipyard.

4 March 1945:
Departs Yokohama. Arrives at Shimoda.

6 March 1945:
Departs Shimoda. Arrives at Yokosuka later that day.

23 March 1945:
Departs Yokosuka. Arrives at Shimoda later that day.

25 March 1945:
Departs Shimoda. Arrives at Yokohama later that day.

14 April 1945:
At 0900 transfers from Yokohama to Yokosuka.

15 April 1945:
At 1400 departs Yokosuka on a transport and survivor rescue mission to Chichijima.

21 April 1945:
Returns to Yokosuka.

22 April 1945:
At 0900 transfers from Yokosuka to Yokohama.

26 May 1945:
At 0900 transfers from Yokohama to Yokosuka.

28 May 1945:
At 1500 departs Yokosuka en route to Minami Torishima.

9 June 1945:
At 0800 arrives at Yokosuka.

20 June 1945:
Departs Yokosuka.

July 1945:
Arrives at Yokosuka.

1 August 1945:
Departs Yokosuka.

2 August 1945:
LtCdr William Cook’s Australian HMAS destroyer NIZAM is escorting HMS ARBITER. They are proceeding to rendezvous with Task Force 37 (BPF) in the vicinity of Saipan. Just before dawn, HMAS NIZAM passes a ship showing lights. HMAS NIZAM challenges, but receives no answer. At first light, the Japanese ensign is seen on the masthead as are large Red Cross signs painted on the craft. HMAS NIZAM sends a boarding party over by whaler to investigate. The party is told that the ship is destined for Torishima (Marcus Island). The ship has accommodations for 100 patients, but has none aboard. KIKU MARU is permitted to proceed.

8 August 1945:
About 250 miles NW of Marcus Island. Destroyer USS CASSIN (DD-372) puts a boarding party aboard KIKU MARU. After observing no violations, USS CASSIN permits KIKU MARU to proceed to Yokosuka.

13 August 1945:
Arrives at Yokosuka.

15 August 1945:
Peace is declared. That same day, KIKU MARU is re-rated a special transport and assigned to Yokosuka’s local demobilization bureau. The ship is later assigned Scapjap Number K-090. [1]

9 October 1945:
Departs Uraga on her first repatriation voyage.

14 October 1945:
Arrives at Kita Daito Jima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

15 October 1945:
Departs Kita Daito Jima.

18 October 1945:
Arrives at Kure. Disembarks troops and passengers.

28 October 1945:
Departs Kure.

30 October 1945:
Arrives at Kita Daito Jima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

1 November 1945:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

5 November 1945:
Departs Kagoshima.

7 November 1945:
Arrives at Kita Daito Jima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

8 November 1945:
Departs Kita Daito Jima.

11 November 1945:
Arrives at Kure. Disembarks troops and passengers.

21 November 1945:
Departs Kure.

25 November 1945:
Arrives at Kita Daito Jima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

26 November 1945:
Departs Kita Daito Jima.

29 November 1945:
Arrives at Kure and undergoes repairs.

9 December 1945:
Repairs are completed.

12 December 1945:
Departs Kure.

14 December 1945:
Arrives at Ishigakijima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

20 December 1945:
Departs Ishigakijima.

24 December 1945:
Arrives at Kure. Disembarks troops and passengers.

3 January 1946:
Departs Kure.

7 January 1946:
Arrives at Miyakoshima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

8 January 1946:
Departs Miyakoshima.

12 January 1946:
Arrives at Otaka. Disembarks troops and passengers.

15 January 1946:
Arrives at Kure for repairs.

23 January 1946:
Repairs are completed.

25 January 1946:
Departs Kure.

30 January 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated. and departs later that day.

4 February 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

10 February 1946:
Departs Hakata.

12 February 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

14 February 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

16 February 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

20 February 1946:
Departs Hakata.

22 February 1946:
Arrives at Lienyunchiang. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

27 February 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 March 1946:
Undergoes repairs at Tamano.

30 March 1946:
Repairs are completed.

3 April 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

7 April 1946:
Arrives at Kwaren (Hua Lien), Formosa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

8 April 1946:
Departs Kwaren.

12 April 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

17 April 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

20 April 1946:
Arrives at Tangku. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

22 April 1946:
Departs Tangku.

27 April 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

30 April 1946:
Departs Hakata.

5 May 1946:
Arrives at Tangku. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

8 May 1946:
Departs Tangku.

12 May 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

14 May 1946:
Departs Hakata.

17 May 1946:
Arrives at Pusan, Korea. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

20 May 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

21 May 1946:
Departs Hakata.

23 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

27 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

30 May 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

3 July 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

7 July 1946:
Arrives at Tangku. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

10 July 1946:
Departs Tangku.

13 July 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 August 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

8 August 1946:
Arrives at Tangku. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated. and departs later that day.

9 August 1946:
Arrives at Tsientsin. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

13 August 1946:
Departs Tsientsin.

16 August 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers. Removed from the Navy List. Returned to her owners.

12 June 1969:
Scrapping begins at Utsumi.

[1] Allied occupation forces were responsible for the return of six million Japanese military personnel and civilians from Japan's defunct far-flung Empire. In addition, there were over a million Korean and about 40,000 Chinese prisoners and conscript laborers and approximately 7,000 Formosans and 15,000 Ryukyu Islanders to be repatriated.

Some Allied and many former IJN warships, from aircraft carriers to kaibokan, were used to facilitate the enormous repatriation effort. Japanese vessels and crews were used to the fullest extent possible to conserve Allied manpower and accelerate demobilization. Each ex-IJN ship first had to be demilitarized; guns removed or, in the case of large warships, barrels severed, ammunition landed, and radar and catapults removed, if fitted. Repatriation of the Chinese on Japanese ships began early in October from Hakata, but U.S. guard detachments had to be placed on many ships to prevent disorder because the Japanese crews could not control the returnees.

Japanese-run repatriation centers were established at Kagoshima, Hario near Sasebo, and Hakata near Fukuoka. Other reception centers were established and operated at Maizuru, Shimonoseki, Sasebo, Senzaki, Kure, Uraga, Yokohama, Moji and Hakodate. Allied line and medical personnel supervised the centers. Incoming Japanese were sprayed with DDT, examined and inoculated for typhus and smallpox, provided with food, and transported to his final destination in Japan.

- Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall.


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