KAIBOKAN!

(Type C Escort by Takeshi Yuki scanned from "Color Paintings of Japanese Warships")

IJN Escort CD-16:
Tabular Record of Movement

© 2007-2014 Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall

Revision 3


5 October 1943:
Laid down at Yokusuka Naval Yard.

25 January 1944:
Launched and numbered CD-16.

31 March 1944:
Completed and registered in the IJN.

8 April 1944:
Departs Yokosuka.

13 April 1944:
Arrives at Saiki.

27 April 1944:
Departs Saiki and later that day arrives at Kure.

17 May 1944:
At 0616, CD-16 departs Tateyama, Japan with destroyer HATAKAZE, kaibokan MIKURA and MIYAKI, minesweeper W-20, subchaser CH-48, minelayer SARUSHIMA and auxiliary netlayer KOA MARU No. 2 escorting convoy No. 3515 consisting of HAKUSAN, NIPPONKAI, TOYO, KINSHU, HINKO, REIKAI, EIKO, NATSUKAWA, SEIGA, AKISHIMA (MEITO) and CHIYO MARUs and UNYO MARU No. 8.

23 May 1944:
At about 0900, W-20 is detached from the convoy.

25 May 1944:
At 0708, the convoy arrives safely at Saipan.

1 June 1944:
At 0552, anticipating an attack by American carrier aircraft, CD-16 departs Saipan and heads SW to Palau with auxiliary subchaser SHONAN MARU No. 11 and an unidentified naval transport escorting a convoy consisting of KOJUN and AKISHIMA MARUs.

4 June 1944:
At 1550, arrives at Woleai Island.

5 June 1944:
At 1805, departs Woleai.

8 June 1944:
At 1630, arrives at Saipan.

13 June 1944:
At 1220, the convoy is bombed and SHONAN MARU No. 11 is disabled and taken in tow by KOJUN MARU.

18 June 1944:
At 0850, arrives at Palau.

11 June 1944:
CD-16 departs Keelung with destroyer KURETAKE, kaibokan CD-6 and subchasers CH-12, CH-35 escorting convoy TAPA-09 consisting of TAMA, AZUCHISAN MARUs and three unidentified ships.

13 June 1944:
Arrives at Takao. KURETAKE likely is detached.

18 June 1944:
Departs Takao.

24 June 1944:
Arrives at Manila.

26 June 1944:
Departs Manila.

28 June 1944:
Arrives at Cebu.

30 June 1944:
At 1000, CD-16 departs Cebu with kaibokan CD-6 and CD-19 and subchasers CH-12 and CH-35 escorting convoy SEPA-01/SEDA-01 consisting of TAMA, OYO and AZUCHISAN MARUs.

1 July 1944:
TAMA MARU separates with CD-16, CD-6, CH-12 and CH-35 and heads for Palau. OYO and AZUCHISAN MARUs and CD-19 head for Davao.

4 July 1944:
At 0230, a friendly aircraft crash lands in the sea. CH-35 is detached to rescue its crew and falls behind. At 0352, LtCdr Carl Tiedeman's (USNA ’33) USS GUAVINA (SS-362), in the second of two attacks, torpedoes and sinks TAMA MARU at 07-50N 133-40E. The ship is carrying a 544 troops, 321 of whom as well as two Gunners and 11 crewmen are killed.

5 July 1944:
The escorts arrive at Palau alone.

19 July 1944:
156 nms SW of Yap Island, Carolines. CD-16 is damaged by a USAAF B-24 air raid.

25 July 1944:
At 0155, CD-16 departs Davao for Zamboanga, Philippines with kaibokan CD-6, minesweeper W-30, subchasers CH-49, CH-58, auxiliary subchaser KYO MARU No. 12, auxiliary netlayer TOKACHI MARU, auxiliaries TOKO MARU and HIYODORI MARU No. 2 escorting convoy Z-258 consisting of AZUCHISAN, OYO, TATSUHARU, RYUKA and KITAGAMI MARUs and HISHI MARU No. 2, KYOEI MARU No. 2 and LST No. 127. The convoy is provided air cover.

27 July 1944:
At about 0100, LtCdr (later Captain) Bladen D. Claggett's (USNA ’35) USS DACE (SS-247) attacks the convoy and sinks tanker KYOEI MARU No. 2. Five crewmen are KIA. At about 1400, the convoy is attacked by aircraft in the Pilas Channel, but suffers no damage. At 1830, the convoy arrives at Zamboanga.

28 July 1944:
CD-16 departs Zamboanga with kaibokan CD-6 and subchasers CH-49 and CH-58 escorting convoy C-294 consisting of four unidentified merchant ships.

31 July 1944:
Arrives at Cebu.

8 August 1944:
CD-16 departs Manila with kaibokan CD-5, CD-6, CD-9, subchaser CH-58 and one unidentified warship escorting convoy MATA-26 consisting of TAKETSU (BUTSU), IKOMASAN, KENEI and ASAKA MARUs and seventeen other unidentified merchant ships.

14 August 1944:
In the eye of a major typhoon, the war-built tanker TAKETSU (BUTSU) MARU breaks up, although as a result of weather or a drifting mine is unclear. Eight crewmen are KIA and the cargo of crude oil is lost. IKOMASAN and ASAKA MARUs are both stranded on islands in the Bashi Islands Group, North of Luzon. Both are later refloated.

17 August 1944:
Arrives at Takao.

9 September 1944:
At 1200, CD-16 departs Moji for Miri, Borneo with kaikoban ETOROFU, SHONAN and CD-6, torpedo boat SAGI and auxiliary gunboat CHOHAKUSAN MARU escorting convoy MI-19 consisting of tankers CHIHAYA, SAN DIEGO, IWAKUNI, DAIMEI, KENZUI, JINEI and MITSU MARUs and cargo ships DAIBIN, ENOURA, MATSUURA, YULIN, HAKUROKU, ARISAN, TEIFU (ex French BOUGAINVILLE), TASMANIA, SHINSEI, DAIA, NIKKO and SHUNSHO MARUs.

10 September 1944:
At 1212, CHIHAYA MARU is torpedoed and sunk by LtCdr's Edward E. Shelby's USS SUNFISH (SS-281) at 33-49N, 127-41E. 76 of the 413 troops onboard, one gunner and eight crewmen are KIA. Also are lost two armored cars from 2nd Company, 10th Tank Regiment and six daihatsu barges. The convoy immediately retires to Chinto (Chin Hajo) Island where it regroups. The escorts launch a concerted, but unsuccessful, attempt to find the submarine.

12 September 1944:
Convoy MI-19 departs Chinto.

17 September 1944:
MI-19 splits. SHONAN and SHUNSHO, NIKKO, MATSUURA, ENOURA and KENZUI MARUs head for Keelung.

18 September 1944:
Arrives at Takao. DAIBIN and SAN DIEGO MARUs are detached, the latter temporarily as the ship later rejoins the convoy after it has sailed. KENEI and HIROTA MARUs also joins the convoy, but CD-5, CD-16, SHONAN, SAGI and CHOHAKUSAN MARU are all detached at Takao.

25 September 1944:
At 1400, CD-16 departs Takao with kaibokan CD-6 , CD-9, destroyer HARUKAZE, subchaser CH-56 and stores ship KURASAKI escorting convoy TAMA-27 consisting of DAIBIN, MANILA, DAIKYO, SAN DIEGO MARUs, very likely DAIIKU, SHUNSHO MARUs and NICHIYU MARU No. 2 and four unidentified merchant ships.

30 September 1944:
An enemy submarine contact is made.

3 October 1944:
Arrives at Masinloc.

4 October 1944:
At 0630, departs Masinloc. Shortly thereafter, DAIBIN and SAN DIEGO MARUs are detached. At 0855, Cdr (later Rear Admiral) Reuben Whitaker's (USNA ’34) USS FLASHER (SS-249) torpedoes and sinks DAIBIN MARU at 15-15N, 119-50E. The ship is carrying the 2nd and 5th Coy, 10th Tank Regiment of the 2nd Tank Division, the 5th Engineers Coy of the division, elements of the division’s transport regiment and elements of the (non-divisional) 27th Signal Regiment and No. 618 base construction personnel of whom 68, as well as eight out of 33 passengers and 34 crewmen are killed. Later that day, the remaining ships arrive at Manila.

6 October 1944:
CD-16 joins convoy TAMA-29 then consisting of EJIRI, TOKO, RYUEI, KOSHO, URATO, TOYOKAWA, NANKING, PEKING, JOGU and EIKO MARUs and two unidentified merchant ships escorted by kaibokan CD-6,CD-20, minesweeper W-38, torpedo boat HIYODORI, sub-chaser CH-61 and auxiliary sub-chasers CHa-95 and CHa-96.

8 October 1944:
At 0250 arrives at North San Fernando. NANKING and PEKING MARUs are detached.

10 October 1944:
Departs North San Fernando. Later, near the Cape Rena Sea. At 1335, LtCdr Donald G. Baer’s (USNA ’37) USS LAPON (SS-260) torpedoes EJIRI MARU with 1589 troops and tanks of 2nd Division at 16-10N, 119-45E. Fires break out and become uncontrollable. Abandon Ship is ordered. Unmanned, the ship drifts away. At 1700 it runs aground on a reef and a violent explosion occurs. At 1800, EJIRI MARU sinks. 191 troops onboard and eight crewmen are killed in the attack. The escorts drop 28 depth-charges, but USS LAPON is not damaged.

12 October 1944:
At dawn, the convoy reaches the Manila Bay area, but the convoy commander is reluctant to enter because of the danger of air attack, so the convoy continues southward.

N of Calavite Strait. At 1410, LtCdr Maurice W. Shea’s (USNA ’37) USS RAY (SS-271) torpedoes and sinks TOKO MARU at 13-32N 128-2IE. The escorts drop 30 depth-charges, but RAY is not damaged. All 29 of the crew are KIA and it is not clear if any of the 120 passengers onboard survive.

13 October 1944:
Arrives at Manila.

17 October 1944:
CD-16 departs Manila with kaibokan CD-6 and minesweeper W-41 escorting the Taihi (Refugee) convoy consisting of TOYOKAWA, SHUNSHO MARUs and four unidentified merchant ships.

20 October 1944:
Reassigned to the 12th Escort Division with CD-14, -38 and CD-46.

21 October 1944:
Arrives at Yulin.

22 October 1944:
CD-16 joins HI-76A convoy consisting of three unidentified merchant ships also escorted by kaibokan escorts TSUSHIMA, DAITO, CD-9 and CD-28 departs St Jacques.

26 October 1944:
At 2016 an enemy submarine is sighted at 20.19N 114.26E.

27 October 1944:
At 1345 an enemy submarine is sighted at 20.42N 114.34E. Soon after DAITO is likely detached.

2 November 1944:
Arrives at Moji.

20 November 1944:
CD-16 departs Saigon for Manila with kaibokan CD-14, CD-38 and CD-46 escorting convoy SAMA-14A consisting of stores ship MAMIYA carrying a full load of ammunition.

25 November 1944:
Off Corregidor, Manila Bay. About 2120, MAMIYA launches a blue signal flare. Just after the signal, kaibokan CD-38 suffers an attack by LtCdr Francis A. Greenup's (USNA ’36) USS HARDHEAD (SS-365). Greenup hits CD-38 below the bridge and sinks her at 14-22N, 119-57E. 85 crewmen are KIA including her CO, LtCdr Hayashi Chiichi. 93 survivors from the aft part abandon ship and later are rescued by CD-46 and other ships and are taken to Manila.

26 November 1944:
Arrives at Manila.

30 November 1944:
At 2104, CD-16 departs Takao for Manila with kaibokan TSUSHIMA, DAITO, CD-14, CD-134 and CD-46 and minesweeper W-101 escorting convoy TAMA-33 consisting of IJA landing craft depot ships SHINSHU and KIBITSU MARUs.

1 December 1944:
As a result of air raids on Manila, convoy TAMA-33 is directed to puts its troops ashore at San Fernando, Luzon. At 2205, the convoy anchors at Pamocctan.

2 December 1944:
At 0630, the convoy departs Pamocctan for Manila where it arrives at 2240.

9 December 1944:
CD-16 departs Takao with kaibokan CD-14, CD-46 and minesweeper W-101. escorting convoy TASA-18 consisting of tankers AMATO, ENKI, DAIETSU, RYOEI MARUs and TAMON MARU No. 15.

10 December 1944:
TAMON MARU No. 15 has an engine breakdown and is detached with minesweeper W-101 for Hong Kong.

13 December 1944:
Arrives at Yulin.

17 December 1944:
At 1530, arrives at St Jacques.

20 December 1944:
At 1000, CD-16 departs Cape St. Jacques, Indochina for Takao and Moji with kaibokan CD-14 and CD-46 escorting convoy SATA-04 consisting of YAMAMURA, TAITO, OJIKASAN, DAIRETSU, DAIIKU and DAIEI MARUs.

24 December 1944:
At 0100, the convoy arrives at Batangan Bay. CD-9 and CD-32 join the escort.

30 December 1944:
Arrives in the Takao area, but at 0633 a radio message is received warning of possible air raids on the port. The convoy makes for Keelung.

31 December 1944:
At 2230, arrives at Keelung, northern Formosa.

2 January 1945:
At 0100, the convoy, now called TAMO-34, departs Keelung for Moji with destroyer KIRI, minesweeper W-17 and subchaser CH-37 as additional escorts.

4 January 1945:
Aircraft strafe the convoy, but only OJIKASAN MARU suffers some minor damage and a number of casualties.

9 January 1945:
At 1200, arrives safely at Moji.

22 January 1945:
At 0600, CD-16 departs Moji for Keelung with destroyer KIRI and kaibokan CD-14, CD-46 escorting convoy MOTA-33. The convoy consists of TEIKA (ex-French CAP VARELLA), CLYDE, NIKKO, NANKING, TAKUSAN, SANJIN, MIYAJIMA and SHOKA MARUs.

29 January 1945:
40 miles N of Keelung. LtCdr (later Cdr) Evan T. Shepard’s (USNA ’35) USS PICUDA (SS-382) torpedoes and sinks CLYDE MARU at 25-20N, 121-06E. At the time the seas are rough and this makes rescue difficult. 972 troops on board, 66 gunners and 61 crewmen are KIA.

30 January 1945:
Arrives at Keelung.

31 January 1945:
At 0600, CD-16 departs Keelung for Moji with kaibokan CD-14 and CD-46 and subchaser CH-19 escorting convoy TAMO-39. The convoy consists of SAMARANG, SHUNSHO, TAISHUN, AIZAN, TETSUYO and TATSUHARU MARUs.

8 February 1945:
Arrives at Moji.

12 February 1945:
At 2200, CD-16 departs Moji for Keelung with light cruiser KASHIMA, destroyer SAKURA, kaibokan CD-14 and CD-46 escorting convoy MOTA-36. The convoy consists of MELBOURNE and NISSHO MARUs.

16 February 1945:
KASHIMA and destroyer SAKURA are detached for Shanghai, China.

18 February 1945:
Arrives at Keelung.

22 February 1945:
At 2200, CD-16 departs Moji for Keelung with kaibokan CD-14 and CD-46 escorting convoy TAMO-44. The convoy consists of MELBOURNE, NISSHO and KIYOKAWA MARUs. That same day, MELBOURNE MARU hits a mine. She is detached back to Keelung escorted by CD-46.

23 February 1945:
CD-46 rejoins the convoy.

28 February 1945:
Arrives at Moji.

10 June 1945:
CD-16 departs Daito Bay for Tsingtao, China with kaibokan CD-132 escorting convoy TASE-04. The convoy consists of FUKUI MARU No. 2 and SOKKYU MARU No. 3.

12 June 1945:
SE of Shantung Peninsula. Aircraft bomb and sink FUKUI MARU No. 2. 37 crewmen are KIA.

14 June 1945:
Arrives at Tsingtao.

12 August 1945:
Hokkaido. CD-16 departs Kushiro with a cargo of gasoline accompanied by CD-6. Cdr (later Rear Admiral/COMSUBPAC) John H. Maurer’s (USNA ’35) USS ATULE (SS-403) makes contact on the two ships steaming along the coast. Maurer decides not to attack because of poor visibility and shallow waters. Instead, he sets course to intercept them in the vicinity of Urakawa Ko.

13 August 1945:
Off Hokkaido, between Cape Erimo and Muroran. About 0100, in a night surface attack, Maurer fires six torpedoes by radar bearings at the two targets when they are overlapping. The nearer of the two ships, CD-6 explodes with an orange flame and flying debris. She sinks with all 200 hands KIA at 42-16N, 142-12E. CD-16 is damaged, but disappears from USS ATULE’s radar and escapes.

15 August 1945: Cessation of Hostilities:
Arrives at Muroran, Hokkaido. CD-16's crew receives notice of the termination of the war.

17 August 1945:
Departs Muroran for Maizuru.

22 August 1945:
Arrives at Maizuru.

24 August 1945:
Kanmon Strait. CD-16 strikes a mine at the eastern entrance to the strait and receives medium damage. Later arrives at Kure.

30 November 1945:
Removed from the Navy List.

1 December 1945:
Assigned to the Allied Repatriation Service as a special cargo ship. [1]

10 December 1945:
Undergoes repairs at Kure.

10 February 1946:
Repairs are completed.

13 February 1946:
Departs Kure on her first repatriation voyage.

15 February 1946:
Arrives at Kirun (Keelung). Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

18 February 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

22 February 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

24 February 1946:
Arrives at Kirun. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

25 February 1946:
Departs Kirun.

28 February 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

3 March 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

6 March 1946:
Arrives at Kirun. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

9 March 1946:
Departs Kirun.

12 March 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

21 March 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

25 March 1946:
Arrives at Kirun. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

28 March 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

3 April 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

5 April 1946:
Arrives at Kwaren (Hua Lien). Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

7 April 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

18 April 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

20 April 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

23 April 1946:
Arrives at Woosung. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

24 April 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

27 April 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

29 April 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 May 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

6 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

11 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

15 May 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

18 May 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

20 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

22 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

24 May 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

29 May 1946:
Undergoes repairs at Mukaijima.

13 June 1946:
Repairs are completed.

17 June 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

20 June 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

24 June 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

26 June 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

8 July 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

9 July 1946:
Arrives at Nakagusuku Bay (White Beach), Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

10 July 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

22 July 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

23 July 1946:
Arrives at Nakagusuku Bay, Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

24 July 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

5 November 1946:
Undergoes repairs at Sasebo.

15 November 1946:
Repairs are completed.

22 December 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

23 December 1946:
Arrives at Pusan. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

24 December 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

1 August 1947:
Singapore. Ceded to the United Kingdom as a war reparation. Later, scrapped at Singapore.


Authors' Note:
[1] Allied occupation forces were responsible for the return of six million Japanese military personnel and civilians from Japan's defunct far-flung Empire. In addition, there were over a million Korean and about 40,000 Chinese prisoners and conscript laborers and approximately 7,000 Formosans and 15,000 Ryukyu Islanders to be repatriated.

Some Allied and many former IJN warships, from aircraft carriers to kaibokan, were used to facilitate the enormous repatriation effort. Japanese vessels and crews were used to the fullest extent possible to conserve Allied manpower and accelerate demobilization. Each ex-IJN ship first had to be demilitarized; guns removed or, in the case of large warships, barrels severed, ammunition landed, and radar and catapults removed, if fitted. Repatriation of the Chinese on Japanese ships began early in October from Hakata, but U.S. guard detachments had to be placed on many ships to prevent disorder because the Japanese crews could not control the returnees.

Japanese-run repatriation centers were established at Kagoshima, Hario near Sasebo, and Hakata near Fukuoka. Other reception centers were established and operated at Maizuru, Shimonoseki, Sasebo, Senzaki, Kure, Uraga, Yokohama, Moji and Hakodate. Allied line and medical personnel supervised the centers. Incoming Japanese were sprayed with DDT, examined and inoculated for typhus and smallpox, provided with food, and transported to his final destination in Japan.

Thanks to Mr. Gilbert Casse of France for assistance with Revision 1.

-Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall


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