Ryuho


Part of the same fleet of ships capable of being converted into aircraft carriers Ryuho underwent the conversion process which lasted from Dec. 1941 to Nov. 1942. During that conversion process, Ryuho was hit by bombs during the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo. After her conversion, Ryuho mainly served as an aircraft ferry or training carrier. Her only combat action was at Philippine Sea where she lost her entire air group to American fighters. She survived the war to be scrapped in its aftermath. Ironically she would have the distinction of being the last carrier to operate outside of Japanese home waters. The general opinion of her was that she was the weakest of the fleet of ships converted into fleet carriers.

Andrew Nguyen

Year Completed1942
Displacement13,360 tons
Dimensions707' x 64' x 22'
Speed26 knots
Armament 8 x 5in guns, 61 x 25mm guns
31 aircraft
Crew989

Additional Info
Ryuho Tabular Record of Movement (TROM)

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Japanese submarine depot ship Taigei, Kure, Japan, spring 1935; she was later converted to light carrier RyuhoJapanese carrier Ryuho, 1942Carrier Ryuho in Tokyo Bay, Japan, Nov 1942Ryuho at Kure, Japan, 1945; note damage to elevators and bulged flight deck
Japanese submarine depot ship Taigei, Kure, Japan, spring 1935; she was later converted to light carrier RyuhoJapanese carrier Ryuho, 1942Carrier Ryuho in Tokyo Bay, Japan, Nov 1942Ryuho at Kure, Japan, 1945; note damage to elevators and bulged flight deck

See all 4 photos of Ryuho on WW2DB






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