KAIBOKAN!

(Type C Escort by Takeshi Yuki scanned from "Color Paintings of Japanese Warships")

IJN Escort CD-67:
Tabular Record of Movement

2009-2017 Bob Hackett and and Peter Cundall

Revision 3


15 June 1944:
Laid down at Maizuru Navy Yard.

15 September 1944:
Launched and numbered CD-67.

12 November 1944:
Completed and registered in the IJN. Attached to Maizuru Naval District. Assigned to Maizuru Guard Force.

1 January 1945:
At 0715, CD-67 departs Moji for Takao with kaibokan CD-36 and CD-26 escorting convoy MOTA-30 consisting of ANYO, HISAGAWA, MEIHO, RASHIN, and DAIGA MARUs and tankers HIKOSHIMA, SANYO, TATSUYO and MANJU MARUs.

4 January 1945:
At 2000 arrives at Ssu Chiao Shan.

7 January 1945:
At 0000 departs Ssu Chiao Shan.

8 January 1945:
At 1830, Cdr (later Rear Admiral/MOH) Eugene B. Fluckey's (USNA 35) USS BARB (SS-220) torpedoes TATSUYO MARU. Loaded with munitions, she explodes and sinks instantly with the loss of all 63 crewmen. At 2020, LtCdr (later Cdr) Evan T. Shepard's (USNA 35) USS PICUDA (SS-382) torpedoes and sinks ANYO MARU with the loss of 138 crewmen and many troops. At 2120, Fluckey's USS BARB torpedoes and damages SANYO MARU. At 2230, while avoiding numerous torpedoes, HIKOSHIMA MARU runs aground in Tunghsiao Bay and is abandoned apparently without casualties. At 2315, Cdr (later Rear Admiral-Ret) Charles E. Loughlin's (USNA 33) USS QUEENFISH (SS-393) torpedoes and damages MANJU MARU. At 2330, SANYO MARU runs aground. CD-39 is despatched from Kirun to aid the stricken convoy.

9 January 1945:
At 2040, MANJU MARU is deliberately run aground. 13 armed guards, 30 crew and an unknown number of passengers are killed. At 0430, SANYO MARU breaks in two and sinks. 12 Armed Guards, two Instructors, three Watchmen and 29 out of 46 of the crewmen are killed during the attack. HISAGAWA MARU and two escorts head south. At about 0600, they join RASHIN MARU and another escort and head for Takao. MEIHO and TAIGA MARUs head for Keelung. At 0915, HISAGAWA and RASHIN MARUs are attacked by aircraft. HISAGAWA MARU is damaged severely and lags behind. The group heads for Mako, Pescadores, but at about 1255, HISAGAWA MARU sinks taking down 2117 men of the IJA's 19th Infantry Division's 3rd Transport Unit, together with 84 gunners and all 86 crewmen. [1]

At 1900 arrives at Mako.

10 January 1945:
Departs Mako.

11 January 1945:
At 1800 arrives at Kirun.

12 January 1945:
At 0800 departs Takao in convoy TAMO-35 consisting of ARIMASAN MARU and one unidentified merchant ship escorted by kaibokan MIKURA, SHIMUSHU, CD-2, CD-66, CD-67 and one unidentified warship.

14 January 1945:
At 1900 arrives at Chusan Island Group.

15 January 1945:
Departs Chusan Island Group.

16 January 1945:
At 2300 arrives at Katoku Suido.

17 January 1945:
Departs Katoku Suido and at 1700 arrives at Moji.

18 January 1945:
At 1230 departs Moji.

19 January 1945:
At 0900 arrives at Kure. Undergoes repairs.

30 January 1945:
At 0730 departs Kure and at 1500 arrives at Moji.

31 January 1945:
At 0630 CD-67 departs Moji kaibokan IKUNA and CD-26 escorting convoy MOTA-34 consisting of three unidentified merchant ships.

3 February 1945:
At 2100 arrives at Hsiao Changtu Shan, Chusan Island group.

4 February 1945:
At 0400 departs and at 1820 arrives at Wenchow.

5 February 1945:
At 1100 departs Wenchow and at 1730 anchors off Foochow.

6 February 1945:
At 0300 departs Foochow and at 1830 arrives at Kirun.

9 February 1945:
At 0130 departs Kirun escorting TAMO-41 with kaibokan IKUNA, CD-26 and CD-76 escorting convoy TAMO-41 consisting of HYUGA and SETTSU MARUs. At 1900 arrives at Mazu Shan.

10 February 1945:
At 0700, departs Mazu Shan. Later that day arrives at Wenchow Bay.

11 February 1945:
Departs Wenchow Bay. At 1930, anchors in Chou Shan (Chusan) island Group.

12 February 1945:
At 0230 departs Chou Shan Islands.

14 February 1945:
At 1815, arrives at Mutsure.

15 February 1945:
At 1230 departs Mutsure.

16 February 1945:
At 0830 arrives at Kure. Undergoes repairs.

27 February 1945:
Arrives at Moji.

3 March 1945:
At 0600 departs Moji escorting MOTA-41 consisting of one unidentified merchant ship also escorted by kaibokan SAKITO and CD-57 and submarine chaser CH-26.

7 March 1945:
At 1600 arrives at Wenchow.

8 March 1945:
At 0600 departs Wenchow and at 1829 arrives at Mazu Shan. Departs at 2300.

11 March 1945:
At 1800 arrives at Kirun (Keelung).

18 March 1945:
At 1800 departs Kirun with submarine chaser CH-17 escorting convoy TAMO-50 consisting of KUMANO MARU (unconfirmed) and tanker NANKO MARU No. 3.

22 March 1945:
At 1920 arrives at Ssu Chiao Shan.

24 March 1945:
At 0600 departs Ssu Chiao Shan

28 March 1945:
At 2330 arrives at Yura.

1 April 1945:
At 1400 the ships arrived at Moji.

2 April 1945:
At 1250 departs Moji.

3 April 1945:
At 1807 arrives at Chinkai. Undergoes repairs.

16 April 1945:
At 0555 departs Chinkai.

17 April 1945:
At 0036 arrives at Hikin Do. At 1935 departs on patrol for the rest of the month.

28 April 1945:
At 0545 departs Daito Wan with Submarine chaser CH-19 escorting SE-1 convoy consisting of NISSHO (2284 grt) and WASHIN MARUs. At sea meets incoming SE-2 convoy consisting of TAIRI, TOKAI MARUs and RYUEI MARU No. 6 and begins escorting these ships back to Daito Wan.

29 April 1945:
At 1130 arrives at Daito Wan.

25 October 1945:
Removed from the Navy List.

1 December 1945:
Formally assigned to the Allied Repatriation Service. [2]

1 November 1945:
Enters dockyard at Maizuru for repairs.

10 January 1946:
Repairs are completed.

13 January 1946:
Departs Sasebo on her first repatriation voyage.

18 January 1946:
Arrives at Guam. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

23 January 1946:
Arrives at Maizuru. Disembarks troops and passengers.

24 January 1946:
Enters Maizuru dockyard for repairs.

10 April 1946:
Repairs completed.

16 April 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

18 April 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

20 April 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

22 April 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

30 April 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

4 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

7 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

9 May 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

17 May 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

19 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

20 May 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

27 May 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

30 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

31 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

2 June 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

7 June 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

9 June 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

10 June 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

12 June 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

28 June 1946:
Enters Maizuru Dockyard for repairs.

8 July 1946:
Repairs are completed.

14 July 1946:
Departs Hakata.

17 July 1946:
Arrives at Korojima near Tsientsin. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

20 July 1946:
Departs Korojima.

23 July 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

7 August 1946:
Departs Hakata.

10 August 1946:
Arrives at Korojima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

13 August 1946:
Departs Korojima.

17 August 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

28 August 1946:
Enters Maizuru Dockyard for repairs.

10 September 1946:
Repairs completed.

1 October 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

3 October 1946:
Arrives at Naze. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

5 October 1946:
Departs Naze.

7 October 1946:
Arrives at Kure. Disembarks troops and passengers.

10 October 1946:
Departs Ujina.

11 October 1946:
Arrives at Naze. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

12 October 1946:
Departs Naze.

14 October 1946:
Arrives at Kure. Disembarks troops and passengers.

17 October 1946:
Departs Otaka.

19 October 1946:
Arrives at Amami O-Shima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later the same day.

20 October 1946:
Arrives at Naze. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later the same day.

22 October 1946:
Arrives at Kure. Disembarks troops and passengers.

25 October 1946:
Departs Otaka.

27 October 1946:
Arrives at Amami Oshima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later the same day.

28 October 1946:
Arrives at Naze. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later the same day.

31 October 1946:
Arrives at Tamano and enters dockard for repairs.

12 November 1946:
Repairs are completed.

29 November 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

30 November 1946:
Arrives at Naze. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

1 December 1946:
Departs Naze.

4 December 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

7 July 1947:
Shanghai. Ceded to the Republic of China as a war reparation. Renamed YING KOU. YING KOU receives two Japanese 12-cm guns and assigned to the Second Fleet.

23 April 1949: Chinese Civil War: the fall of Nanking:
YING KOU departs Nanking, successfully penetrates the Communist blockade of the Yangtze River and later arrives at Shanghai.

28 May 1950: the Wanshan Archipelago Campaign of the Chinese Civil War:
Following the capture of Wanshan Archipelago at the mounth of the Pearl River by the Chinese Communist troops, the Nationalists deploy a small naval detachment to the area north of Little Green Islet to bombard the Communist positions and intercept the transports from mainland China. The Nationalist squadron includes the former IJN escorts CD-67, CD-104 and the escort destroyer HATSUUME.

1952:
YING KOU undergoes the conversion to a gunboat. Her new armament includes one 3-in and two 40-mm guns, as well as 8 machine guns. She is renamed as RUI AN (PF-73).

1963:
Discarded.


Authors' Notes:
[1] On 20 Jan '45, MANJU MARU was sunk by aircraft in the location of her grounding.

[2] Allied occupation forces were responsible for the return of six million Japanese military personnel and civilians from Japan's defunct far-flung Empire. In addition, there were over a million Korean and about 40,000 Chinese prisoners and conscript laborers and approximately 7,000 Formosans and 15,000 Ryukyu Islanders to be repatriated.

Some Allied and many former IJN warships, from aircraft carriers to kaibokan, were used to facilitate the enormous repatriation effort. Japanese vessels and crews were used to the fullest extent possible to conserve Allied manpower and accelerate demobilization. Each ex-IJN ship first had to be demilitarized; guns removed or, in the case of large warships, barrels severed, ammunition landed, and radar and catapults removed, if fitted. Repatriation of the Chinese on Japanese ships began early in October from Hakata, but U.S. guard detachments had to be placed on many ships to prevent disorder because the Japanese crews could not control the returnees.

Japanese-run repatriation centers were established at Kagoshima, Hario near Sasebo, and Hakata near Fukuoka. Other reception centers were established and operated at Maizuru, Shimonoseki, Sasebo, Senzaki, Kure, Uraga, Yokohama, Moji and Hakodate. Allied line and medical personnel supervised the centers. Incoming Japanese were sprayed with DDT, examined and inoculated for typhus and smallpox, provided with food, and transported to his final destination in Japan.

Thanks to Mr. Gilbert Casse of France.

-Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall


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