KAIBOKAN!

(Type C Escort by Takeshi Yuki scanned from "Color Paintings of Japanese Warships")

IJN Escort CD-44:
Tabular Record of Movement

© 2007-2012 Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall

Revision 3


15 April 1944:
Nagasaki. Laid down at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries’ shipyard.

7 July 1944:
Launched and numbered CD-44.

31 August 1944:
Completed and registered in the IJN.

15 November 1944:
CD-44 departs Kagoshima, Kyushu with kaibokan CD-30, CD-42, auxiliary minesweeper TAIHEI MARU No. 3 Go, TOSHI MARU No. 7, CHOUN MARU No. 8, auxiliary patrol boat CHIKUTO MARU and TAIAN MARU escorting convoy KATA-416 consisting of UNTEN, KAIJO, KAIRYU, CHOSAN, TAISEI, SEIZAN, AMOY and KENJO MARUs and two unidentified merchant ships that only sail as far as Koniya, Amami-Oshima Island.

16 November 1944:
AMOY MARU and the two unidentified merchant ships are detached at Koniya.

18 November 1944:
KATA-416 arrives at Naha, Okinawa. TAISEI, SEIZAN and KENJO MARUs depart for Keelung, Takao and Manila respectively.

21 November 1944:
CD-44 departs Naha with auxiliary minesweepers KAIYO MARU No. 1 Go, CHOUN MARU No. 8, TOSHI MARU No. 7, CHITOSE MARU and auxiliary patrol boat CHIKUTO MARU and HOKOKU MARU No. 3 Go escorting convoy NAKA-804 consisting of NICHIRIN (ex British MATA HARI), UNTEN MARUs and two unidentified merchant ships enroute to Kagoshima, some direct and some via Koniya.

26 November 1944:
CD-44 departs Kagoshima for Keelung with kaibokan CD-42, torpedo boat MANAZURU, minelayer NUWAJIMA, minesweeper W-15, auxiliary minesweepers HIMESHIMA MARU, TAKUNAN MARU No. 3 and TOSHI MARU No. 7 and auxiliary patrol boat CHIKUTO MARU escorting convoy KATA-614 consisting of NAZE, DAISHIN, KEIUN, TOYOSAKA, RYUKYU MARUs, HOEI MARU No. 3, HOEI MARU No. 5, HAKUTETSU MARU No. 11, KINYU MARU No. 3 and six unidentified merchant ships.

30 November 1944:
Off Kerama Retto: KEIUN MARU is detached.

11 December 1944:
CD-44 departs Keelung escorting convoy TAKA-107 consisting of TENSHO, NANKING MARUs and fourteen unidentified merchant ships escorted by kaibokan CD-42, torpedo boat MANAZURU, minelayer NUWAJIMA, minesweeper W-15 and auxiliary minesweepers TAKUNAN MARU No. 3 and TOSHI MARU No. 7 enroute to Kagoshima, some direct and some via Miyako Shima and Kasari Bay.

25 December 1944:
CD-44 departs Kagoshima enroute to Keelung, via Naha and Miyako Shima with torpedo boat MANAZURU (part way), kaibokan CD-30 (part way), CD-42 (part way), minesweeper W-15 (part way), auxiliary minesweepers BANSHU MARU No. 51, TAKUNAN MARU No. 3, TOSHI MARU No. 7 and CHOUN MARU No. 8 escorting convoy KATA-506 consisting of KISHUN MARU and eight unidentified merchant ships.

28 December 1944:
Arrives at Naha.

24 January 1945:
CD-44, torpedo boat MANAZURU, minelayer NUWAJIMA, minesweeper W-15, auxiliary minesweepers TAKUNAN MARU No. 3, CHOUN MARU No. 8 and HIMESHIMA and SEKI MARUs depart Kirun escorting convoy (number unknown) consisting of SEIZAN (2018 GRT) and KISHUN MARUs and possibly other ships.

31 January 1945:
Arrives at Kagoshima.

8 March 1945:
At 2200 CD-44 departs Kagoshima for Naha with CD-118, auxiliary minesweeper TAIHEI MARU No. 3 and auxiliary netlayer SHINTO MARU No. 2 escorting convoy KANA-803 consisting of DOKAN, KEIZAN and SANKA MARUs.

9 March 1945:
At about 2345, CD-44 initiates a series of depth charges attacks on an unknown contact.

10 March 1945:
N of Amami O-Shima. At 0445, LtCdr Edward Ackerman’s (USNA ’39) USS KETE (SS-369) torpedoes and sinks SANKA MARU at 29-25N, 128-15E. The ship blows up and sinks immediately. 592 troops on board and these together with 13 gunners and 51 crewmen are KIA. At 0705, Ackerman torpedoes and sinks DOKAN MARU at 29-25N, 127-30E. The ship is loaded with 603 M3 petrol, 400 M3 of ammunition, 20 cars and other war supples for Okinawa totalling 3352 M3 as well as 29 passengers. Four passengers, 23 gunners and 27 of the crew are KIA and the cargo is lost. At 0710, KETE torpedoes and sinks KEIZAN MARU that was carrying a cargo of 30 “Shinyo” explosive motor boats, 12 aerial torpedoes, 1000-tons of equipment and 500 barrels of gasoline. 54 soldiers, 10 Escort troops and 43 crewmen are KIA.

After the loss of their charges, CD-44 and the other escorts return to Kagoshima. The USS KETE fails to return from this patrol.

17 March 1945:
CD-44 departs Kagoshima for Naha with CD-118, auxiliary minesweeper TAIAN MARU and auxiliary netlayer SHINTO MARU escorting convoy KATA-504 consisting of EDOGAWA and CHOKAI MARUs, OKINOYAMA MARU No. 5 and an unidentified ship.

21 March 1945:
The convoy arrives at Naha. CD-44 and CD-118 departs Naha escorting EDOGAWA MARU.

22 March 1945:
Arrives at Ishigaki-Jima.

24 March 1945:
Arrives at Keelung.

25 March 1945:
At 1044, USN codebreakers intercept and decrypt a message from CD-44 that reads: “While escorting KATA No. 504 convoy to Naha at ---- on the 20th in position 27-40N, 126-28E a large number of ----- wooden barrels were sighted floating in the sea. It is believed that the debris might have some connection with the disaster to No. 18 Transport."

28 March 1945:
CD-44 departs Keelung for Moji with CD-118 and minesweeper W-39 escorting convoy TAMO-51 consisting of DAIJO, EDOGAWA and NISSHIN MARUs and HORAI MARU No. 12.

2 April 1945:
At 0920, LtCdr (later Cdr) Ralph C. Styles’ (USNA ’33) USS SEA DEVIL (SS-400) torpedoes and sinks DAIJO and NISSHIN MARUs. On DAIJO MARU seven of the escort party and ten of the crew are killed. The ship was loaded with sugar and 2000 tons of general cargo. NISSHIN MARU was lost without survivors, nine Auxiliary Gunners and all 38 crew died. At 0930, Styles torpedoes and sinks EDOGAWA MARU at 34-02N, 124-00E. 48 crewmen are KIA.

3 April 1945:
At 1653, USN codebreakers intercept and decrypt a message probably from CD-44 that reads: “---Captain of CD-44 confirms the fact that at least two enemy submarines are lurking in the vicinity [34-02 N, 124-00 E]. Furthermore, the three vessels of TAMO-51 Convoy (EDOGAWA MARU, NISSHIN MARU and HORAI MARU No. 12) have not been heard from since they broke off from their escorts about 1400 yesterday, the 2nd -----.”

7 April 1945:
At 1908, codebreakers decrypt a message from the CO of CD-44 that reads: “Although we received the cooperation of the Yellow Sea Area Force and have carried out anti-sub sweep and search for the convoy, there is absolutely no clue. All 4 merchant ships seem to be lost. Since time is short, request that we make break off search and return to Sasebo.”

8 April 1945:
At 1154, codebreakers decrypt a message that reads: “Convoy TAMO-51 at 0920, 2 April in position 34-02 N., 124-00 E. proceeding through fog received combined attack by enemy submarine. The first ship, DAIJO MARU was hit and sunk. Next, we heard the sound of two torpedo explosions hitting the second ship, EDOGAWA MARU, at 1030. While carrying out search, next we saw three flashes to the northward. Although searched that afternoon and continued to do so til 7 April, have found no trace of the ships of the convoy.”

28 July 1945:
Sasebo. Aircraft of Admiral (later Fleet Admiral) William F. Halsey, Jr.’s (USNA ’04) Third Fleet’s Task Force 38 damage CD-44 and kaibokan HABUSHI.

15 August 1945:
Sasebo. CD-44's crew is notified of the termination of the war.

5 October 1945:
Removed from the Navy List.

12 October 1945:
Departs Sasebo on her first repatriation voyage.

19 October 1945:
Arrives at Manila. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

21 October 1945:
Arrives ats Davao. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated. and departs later that day.

23 October 1945:
Arrives at Tacloban. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

28 October 1945:
Departs Tacloban.

3 November 1945:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

22 November 1945:
Departs Kure.

28 November 1945:
Arrives at Manila. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

30 November 1945:
Departs Manila.

1 December 1945:
Formally assigned to the Allied Repatriation Service. [1]

6 December 1945:
Arrives at Otaka. Disembarks troops and passengers.

23 December 1945:
Departs Kure.

25 December 1945:
Arrives at Kirun. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later the same day.

27 December 1945:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

2 January 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

4 January 1946:
Arrives at Kirun. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

5 January 1946:
Departs Kirun.

8 January 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

13 January 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

15 January 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later the same day.

16 January 1946:
Arrives at Kirun. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated. and departs later the same day.

19 January 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

25 February 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

27 February 1946:
Arrives at Kirun and departs later the same day.

1 March 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 March 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

6 March 1946:
Arrives at Kirun. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

9 March 1946:
Departs Kirun.

11 March 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

18 March 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

20 March 1946:
Arrives at Uraga. Enters drydock.

13 April 1946:
Undocked. Repairs are completed.

16 April 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

18 April 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

20 April 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

22 April 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

28 April 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

1 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

6 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

8 May 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

17 May 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

19 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

20 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

22 May 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

6 June 1946:
Undergoes repair at Kitakami yard.

15 June 1946:
Repairs are completed.

16 June 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

18 June 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

19 June 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

24 June 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 July 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

7 July 1946:
Arrives at Korojima near Tsientsin. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

9 July 1946:
Departs Korojima.

15 July 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

18 July 1946:
Departs Hakata.

21 July 1946:
Arrives at Korojima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

24 July 1946:
Departs Korojima.

27 July 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

5 July 1947:
Ceded to the United States as a war reparation.

25 August 1947:
SE of Boso Peninsula, Honshu. Sunk as target in 34-48N, 139-42E.


Authors' Notes:
[1] Allied occupation forces were responsible for the return of six million Japanese military personnel and civilians from Japan's defunct far-flung Empire. In addition, there were over a million Korean and about 40,000 Chinese prisoners and conscript laborers and approximately 7,000 Formosans and 15,000 Ryukyu Islanders to be repatriated.

Some Allied and many former IJN warships, from aircraft carriers to kaibokan, were used to facilitate the enormous repatriation effort. Japanese vessels and crews were used to the fullest extent possible to conserve Allied manpower and accelerate demobilization. Each ex-IJN ship first had to be demilitarized; guns removed or, in the case of large warships, barrels severed, ammunition landed, and radar and catapults removed, if fitted. Repatriation of the Chinese on Japanese ships began early in October from Hakata, but U.S. guard detachments had to be placed on many ships to prevent disorder because the Japanese crews could not control the returnees.

Japanese-run repatriation centers were established at Kagoshima, Hario near Sasebo, and Hakata near Fukuoka. Other reception centers were established and operated at Maizuru, Shimonoseki, Sasebo, Senzaki, Kure, Uraga, Yokohama, Moji and Hakodate. Allied line and medical personnel supervised the centers. Incoming Japanese were sprayed with DDT, examined and inoculated for typhus and smallpox, provided with food, and transported to his final destination in Japan.

Thanks go to John Whitman of the USA for info on CNO intercepts of Japanese messages and to Mr. Gilbert Casse of France.

-Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall


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