KAIBOKAN!

(Type C Escort by Takeshi Yuki scanned from "Color Paintings of Japanese Warships")

IJN Escort CD-37:
Tabular Record of Movement

© 2007-2010 Bob Hackett, Sander Kingsepp and Peter Cundall


5 April 1944:
Laid down at Nihonkai-Senkyo K.K’s shipyard at Toyama as kaibokan No. 2419.

5 August 1944:
Launched and numbered CD-37.

3 November 1944:
Completed and registered in Yokosuka Naval District. Assigned to the Kure Guard Unit. LtCdr Okami Kazuo is the Commanding Officer. Transferred to Saeki for training and working up. Participates in ASW and AA exercises in that area. [1]

15 December 1944:
Completes training and working-up. Reassigned to the Yokosuka Naval District. Departs Saeki for Yokosuka. CD-37 is reassigned as the training ship for senior students of the Yokosuka Gunnery School.

During training, Emperor Hirohito's (Showa) brother Captain Prince Nobuhito Takamatsu (52)(former Chief Gunnery Off of HIEI), Chief Instructor at the Gunnery School, comes aboard CD-37 followed by his student officers. The Imperial Family's sixteen-petal chrysanthemum flag is raised over CD-37 to mark the presence of the prince.

April 1945:
Tokyo. Dry-docked at Uraga dockyard for maintenance and modernization. A Type 13 air-search radar is installed. After testing and training of the device, CD-37 departs for Yokosuka where the ship is fitted with mine laying equipment.

E 14 May 1945:
Uraga. CD-37 is attacked by a USN carrier-based planes and claims one Grumman F6F "Hellcat" fighter shot down. Later, CD-37 sends a cutter and recovers the drop tank of the fighter.

15 July 1945:
Reassigned to No. 1 Special Attack (Tokko) Force. While anchoring at Kurihama (near Yokosuka), CD-37's rudder malfunctions. Shipyard workers are dispatched to assist in repairs. After finishing the repairs the kaibokan heads out to Kujukurigahama area to test her sonar gear. While returning to Yokosuka she is attacked by several North American P-51 "Mustang" fighters. Later, CD-37 conducts sounding and measurements in the Kujyu-Kurihama area where American invasion landings are expected.

5 August 1945:
CD-37 is designated the flagship of Rear Admiral Aitoku Ichiro (45) (former CO of UNYO) who is aboard in command of a mining mission off the Boso peninsula with kaibokan SHISAKA, minelayer/netlayer KYOSAI and auxiliary minelayer KINJO MARU. After nightfall departs Yokosuka for Kujyu-Kurihama beach, a probable US landing area.

6 August 1945:
E of Nojimazaki. During the forenoon all mines are sown and the unit heads back, when several air alarms are received. In Shirahama Bight CD-37 comes under a strafing attack by fighters of Vice Admiral (later Admiral) John H. Towers’ Task Force 58 returning from the Tokyo area. The CO, LtCdr Kusudo Koichi, and a number of bridge officers are wounded and five sailors are KIA (another dies of his wounds later).

CD-37 heads towards Yokosuka at flank speed. A gasoline fire breaks out but is quickly subdued. Leakage resulting from strafing damage to the hull is contained, using hand pumps. The planes also attack and damage minelayer KYOSAI at 34-52N, 139-58E. KYOSAI's cutter is strafed and its fuel tank ignites. The flaming boat is jettisoned overboard. Kaibokan SHISAKA is undamaged and departs the area at high speed.

Later that day the CD-37 arrives at Kurihama where all wounded personnel are disembarked. The injured crewmen and the bodies of those KIA are sent to Yokosuka Naval Hospital. CD-37 heads for Uraga to be dry-docked.

15 August 1945:
Uraga. CD-37’s crew hear the Emperor's radio announcement of the end of the war.

15 September 1945:
Removed from the Navy List.

8 October 1945:
Named Special Transport KAI No. 37 in the Allied Repatriation Service. Departs Uraga on her first repatriation voyage. [2]

14 October 1945:
Arrives at Endabi. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

18 October 1945:
Departs Endabi.

26 October 1945:
Arrives at Uraga. Disembarks troops and passengers.

28 October to 8 November 1945:
Under repair at Uraga.

11 November 1945:
Departs Tokyo.

16 November 1945:
Arrives at Guam. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

19 November 1945:
Arrives at Truk. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

20 November 1945:
Departs Truk.

28 November 1945:
Arrives at Uraga. Disembarks troops and passengers.

2 December 1945 to 15 January 1946:
Under repairs at Tsurumi.

20 January 1946:
Departs Uraga. Disembarks troops and passengers.

25 January 1946:
Arrives at Guam. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

26 January 1946:
Departs Guam.

31 January 1946:
Arrives at Palau. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

26 February 1946:
Departs Palau.

5 March 1946:
Arrives at Uraga. Disembarks troops and passengers.

9 March 1946:
Undergoes repairs at Tsurumi.

16 March 1946:
Repairs are completed.

30 March 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

1 April 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

3 April 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

4 April 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo and departs later that day.

7 April 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

14 April 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

22 April 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

24 April 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

27 April 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

29 April 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

5 May 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

7 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

10 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

12 May 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

19 May 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

21 May 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

23 May 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

24 May 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

2 June 1946 to 5 June 1946:
Under repair at Miho.

18 June 1946:
Departs Uraga.

21 June 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

25 June 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

28 June 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

13 July 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

19 July 1946:
Arrives at Korojima near Tsientsin. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

21 July 1946:
Departs Korojima.

28 July 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 August 1946:
Departs Hakata.

7 August 1946:
Arrives at Korojima near Tsientsin. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

9 August 1946:
Departs Korojima.

14 August 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

22 August 1946:
Undergoes repairs at Higashigawa.

10 September 1946:
Repairs are completed.

19 October 1946:
Departs Nagasaki.

21 October 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

27 October 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

29 October 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 November 1946:
Undergoes repairs at Kobe.

16 November 1946:
Repairs are completed.

17 November 1946:
Departs Osaka.

20 November 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa and departs the same day.

21 November 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

22 November 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

23 November 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs the same day.

25 November 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

29 November 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

30 November 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs the same day.

1 December 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

14 December 1946:
Departs Kagoshima.

15 December 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

16 December 1946:
Departs Okinawa.

17 December 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 September 1947:
Ceded to the United States as a war reparation.

30 October 1947:
Osaka. Scrapped.


Authors' Note:
[1] The wartime history of CD-37 was written on 5 May 1981 by Yoshida Ikujiro, former IJN Second Class Machinery Mate.

[2] Allied occupation forces were responsible for the return of six million Japanese military personnel and civilians from Japan's defunct far-flung Empire. In addition, there were over a million Korean and about 40,000 Chinese prisoners and conscript laborers and approximately 7,000 Formosans and 15,000 Ryukyu Islanders to be repatriated.

Some Allied and many former IJN warships, from aircraft carriers to kaibokan, were used to facilitate the enormous repatriation effort. Japanese vessels and crews were used to the fullest extent possible to conserve Allied manpower and accelerate demobilization. Each ex-IJN ship first had to be demilitarized; guns removed or, in the case of large warships, barrels severed, ammunition landed, and radar and catapults removed, if fitted. Repatriation of the Chinese on Japanese ships began early in October from Hakata, but U.S. guard detachments had to be placed on many ships to prevent disorder because the Japanese crews could not control the returnees.

Japanese-run repatriation centers were established at Kagoshima, Hario near Sasebo, and Hakata near Fukuoka. Other reception centers were established and operated at Maizuru, Shimonoseki, Sasebo, Senzaki, Kure, Uraga, Yokohama, Moji and Hakodate. Allied line and medical personnel supervised the centers. Incoming Japanese were sprayed with DDT, examined and inoculated for typhus and smallpox, provided with food, and transported to his final destination in Japan.

Thanks for assistance go to Dr. Higuchi Tatsuhiro, Mr. Motoyuki Iwashige and Mr. Iwasaki Yutaka of Japan.

-Bob Hackett, Sander Kingsepp and Peter Cundall


Back to Escort Page