KAIBOKAN!

(Type C Escort by Takeshi Yuki scanned from "Color Paintings of Japanese Warships")

IJN Escort CD-32:
Tabular Record of Movement

© 2007-2016 Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall

Revision 4


15 February 1944:
Nagasaki. Laid down at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries’ shipyard.

10 May 1944:
Launched and numbered CD-32.

10 June 1944:
Reserve LtCdr Ozaki Yatsunori (former navigating officer of EIKO MARU) is appointed Chief Equipping Officer.

30 June 1944:
Completed and registered in the IJN. Attached to Sasebo Naval District. Assigned to Kure Guard Force. Reserve LtCdr Ozaki Yatsunori is the Commanding Officer.

30 July 1944:
Assigned to the General Escort Command’s First Surface Escort Division.

4 August 1944:
At 1600 CD-32 departs Moji for Takao with kaibokan ETOROFU, HIBURI and CD-25 escorting convoy MOTA-22 consisting of KENJO, GASSAN, HAKUSAN, TEIKA (ex French CAP VARELLA), TERUKUNI, TACHIBANA, NANREI, GENKAI, TEIHOKU (ex French PERSEE), HIOKI, MANSHU, SHIRANESAN, SHONAN, RAKUTO and KOSHIN MARUs and YAMAMIZU MARU No. 2, DAIBOSHI MARU No. 6 and six unidentified ships. Among other cargo, the convoy carries the IJA's 25th Tank Regiment redeploying from Baotau, North China to Formosa.

6 August 1944:
Off SW Kyushu. At 0411, LtCdr (later Admiral/CINCPACFLT) Bernard A. Clarey’s (USNA ’34) USS PINTADO (SS-387) torpedoes and sinks SHONAN MARU at 30-53N, 129-45E. Two crewmen and three gunners are KIA and four Daihatsu barges lost.

9 August 1944:
At 1310, KOSHIN MARU's cargo suddenly explodes and the ship sinks at 26-10N, 124-15E. 28 crewmen are KIA.

10 August 1944:
At 1600 arrives at Kirun (Keelung). KENJO, GASSAN, HAKUSAN, TEIKA (ex French CAP VARELLA) and HIOKI MARUs are detached.

11 August 1944:
At 0330 departs Keelung.

12 August 1944:
At 1430 arrives at Saei (Tsoying) near Takao.

14 August 1944:
MATA-26 is hit by a major typhoon, and war built tanker TAKETSU (BUTSU) MARU breaks up, though whether a result of the weather or a drifting mine is unclear. IKOMASAN and ASAKA MARUs are both stranded on islands in the Bashi Island Group, North of Luzon. Both are later refloated.

17 August 1944:
At 0800 CD-8, CD-25 and CD-32 depart Saei to Batan Island Group to provide escort cover during refloating operations.

18 August 1944:
CD-32 meets up with EIYO MARU off Basco and escorts the ship to Formosa.

19 August 1944:
At 2030 arrives at Saei.

22 August 1944:
At 1410, CD-32 departs Takao for Manila with torpedo boat HATO, kaibokan YASHIRO, CD-8, CD-25 and minesweepers W-38, W-39 escorting convoy TAMA-24 consisting of HIDA, KOTOKU, TEIHOKU (ex French PERSEE), RAKUTO, BATOPAHAT, GENKAI and MANSHU MARUs and tankers TACHIBANA and YAMAMIZU MARU No. 2 and an unidentified ship, probably YUKIKAWA MARU.

25 August 1944:
CD-25 and GENKAI MARU are detached from the convoy and go to Pasaleng Bay to offload five MTB's from the deck of damaged HAKKO MARU No. 2 sheltering in the bay with destroyer YUNAGI. YUNAGI is detached and joins TAMA-24.

At 1024, Cdr (later Vice Admiral) Glynn R. Donaho's (USNA ’27) USS PICUDA (SS-382) torpedoes and sinks KOTOKU MARU steaming in ballast, at 18-42N, 120-49E. 16 crewmen are KIA. At 1026, in the same position, Donaho torpedoes and sinks YUNAGI as the destroyer attempts a counter-attack. 32 sailors are KIA. At 1325, LtCdr (later Rear Admiral-Ret) Louis D. McGregor's (USNA ’30) USS REDFISH (SS-395) torpedoes and sinks BATOPAHAT MARU with 480 troops, weapons and war supplies, at 18-31N, 120-32E. 17 crewmen and an unknown number of passengers are KIA.

27 August 1944:
At 1630 CD-32 meets up and begins escorting the main TAMA-24 convoy.

28 August 1944:
At 2100, arrives at Manila. 2 September 1944: At 0230 departs Manila. Later arrives at Lapoc Bay and departs the same day. 3 Sepotember 144: At 1530 arrives back at Manila.

5 September 1944:
At 1200 CD-32 departs Manila for Miri, Borneo with kaibokan CD-8 and CD-25 escorting convoy MAMI-10 consisting of FUKUJU, TEIHOKU (Ex French PERSEE) and ZUIYO MARUs and four unidentified merchant ships.

7 September 1944:
At 2300 arrives at Eran Bay, Palawan.

8 September 1944:
At 0700 departs Eran Bay. At 1600 anchors in 08-22N 117-08E.

9 September 1944:
At 0500 departs anchorage point.

11 September 1944:
At 1100 arrives at Miri.

15 September 1944:
At 1500, CD-32 departs Miri for Manila, Philippines with kaibokan CD-8, CD-25 and CD-28 escorting convoy MIMA-11 consisting of fleet oiler KAMOI and TACHIBANA, URAL, YAMAMIZU No. 2, KYOKUHO, SHIKISAN, HOKKI, ZUIYO, TATSUHARU, TENSHIN, SHOEI, OMINE, KYOEI and IMAHARU MARUs (ex-Dutch De KLERK) and SHINSEI MARU No. 1 and KYOEI MARU No. 6. The convoy hugs the coast calling at various small anchorages.

16 September 1944:
At 1800 arrives at Kimanis Bay.

17 September 1944:
At 0600 departs Kimanis Bay and at 1830 arrives at White Rocks Bay.

18 September 1944:
At 0100 departs White Rocks Bay and at 1800 arrives at Eran Bay.

19 September 1944:
At 0100 departs Eran Bay.

22 September 1944:
Arrives at Bacuit Bay.

25 September 1944:
At 0845 the convoy now consisting of TACHIBANA, URAL, KYOKUHO, HOKKI, OMINE, ZUIYO MARUs, YAMAMIZU MARU No. 2 and likely SHOEI MARU departs Bacuit Bay.

27 September 1944:
At 0807, Cdr (later Rear Admiral) Reuben T. Whitaker's (USNA ’34) USS FLASHER (SS-249) torpedoes and sinks URAL MARU at 15-32N, 117-16E. 144 passengers, five gunners and 40 out of 189 crew are killed. Two hours later, LtCdr Donald G. Baer's (USNA ’37) USS LAPON (SS-260) torpedoes and sinks HOKKI MARU at 15-50N, 117-41E. Two crewmen are killed.

28 September 1944:
At 1000, the convoy arrives at Santa Cruz.

30 September 1944:
At 0710 the convoy departs Santa Cruz.

1 October 1944:
At 0700, convoy MIMA-11 departs Santa Cruz. At 1100, LtCdr William C. Thompson's (USNA ’35) USS CABRILLA (SS-288) torpedoes and sinks ZUIYO MARU at 16-07N, 119-43E. 45 survivors of URAL MARU, two Gunners and 19 crewmen are KIA. At 1155, Thompson torpedoes and sinks KYOKUHO MARU loaded with crude oil, at 16-11N, 119-44E. 43 of the 112 troops on board, nine watchmen and 66 crewmen are KIA.

2 October 1944:
Arrives at North San Fernando. At 1900 departs.

3 October 1944:
At 0900 CD-25 and CD-32 joins briefly with MI-19 convoy. At 1500 the convoy arrives at Lapoc.

4 October 1944:
At 0600 CD-25 and CD-32 detach from the convoy and at 1730 arrives at San Fernando.

5 October 1944:
At 0630 departs San Fernando and at 1800 arrives at Santa Cruz.

6 October 1944:
At 0610, CD-25 and CD-32 departs Santa Cruz and at 1500 north of San Fernando meets up with rest of escort of combined MATA-28 and MIMA-11 convoys consisting of KOHOKU, HOKUREI, BUNZAN, SHOEI, HOKUSEN, TERUKUNI, HISHIGATA and OMINE MARUs and SHINYO MARU No. 8 with oilers KAMOI and TACHIBANA MARU and YAMAMIZU MARU No. 2 escorted by kaibokan CD-8, minesweeper W-20 and subchasers CH-28, CH-30, CH-33 and CH-41.

At about 0800, LtCdr Henry C. Stevenson's (USNA ’30) USS ASPRO (SS-309) attacks the convoy. Stevenson fires three torpedoes by periscope at a tanker and claims one hit, but actually achieves no results. At 1530, LtCdr William C. Thompson's USS CABRILLA (SS-288) torpedoes HOKUREI MARU and YAMAMIZU MARU No. 2. YAMAMIZU MARU No. 2 sinks with the loss of 56 crewmen. Only two survivors are rescued. HOKUREI MARU is badly damaged and beached off Vigan. Five passengers and four crewmen are killed in the torpedo attack. At 1830, the convoy retires to Lapoc Bay, Philippines.

7 October 1944:
At 0030, the rest of convoy departs for Yulin, Hainan Island, except for TERUKUNI and OMINE MARUs and SHINYO MARU No. 8. At 0600, TACHIBANA MARU and KAMOI accompanied by kaibokan CD-8 and probably CH-28 are detached.

8 October 1944:
At 2325, LtCdr (later Cdr) Victor B. McCrea's (USNA ’32) USS HOE (SS-258) torpedoes and sinks KOHOKU MARU at 18-31N, 116-00E. 361 passengers, ten guards, five watchmen and 41 crewmen are KIA – a total of 417 men killed. CD-25 and CH-41 launch an immediate depth charge attack while CD-32 and W-20 shepherd the convoy away from the area.

9 October 1944:
Air raids on Takao are imminent, so at 1600 the convoy is ordered to Hong Kong.

11 October 1944:
At 1013. the convoy arrives Hong Kong.

14 October 1944:
CD-25 and CD-32 departs Hong Kong.

18 October 1944:
Off Samah, Hainan Island. CD-32 is refuelled by oiler NICHIEI MARU. CD-32 and kaibokan CD-25 join the escort of convoy HI-76 consisting of oilers KUROSHIO, TENEI, TARAKAN and TOHO (1944) MARUs and cargo ship TEIHOKU MARU (ex-French PERSEE) escorted by escort carrier SHINYO and kaibokan DAITO, KANJU, KURAHASHI, CD-28 and torpedo boat HIYODORI.

20 October 1944:
KURAHASHI and CD-25 are detached to escort oiler NICHIEI MARU to Coron Bay.

22 October 1944:
At 1200, arrives Mako. CD-32, KUROSHIO and TOHO MARUs are detached.

31 October 1944:
The oiler NICHIEI MARU departs Manila for Singapore via Miri escorted by kaibokan KURAHASHI and CD-32.

6 November 1944:
At 0657, CD-32 and kaibokan KURAHASHI receive orders to proceed to Miri, Borneo and escort oiler HAKKO MARU to Brunei where HAKKO MARU will unload a cargo of oil in drums for the 2nd Fleet.

17 November 1944:
On that day, FRUMEL decrypts the following message:
"Convoy of 3 ships escorted by Coast Defence Ship 32, will pass through the following noon positions:
19th: 4.30N, ...E
20th: 5.30N, 108.00E
21st: 4.15N, 110.30E
22nd: 5.40N, 114.30E. "

This message evidently refers to convoy SHIMA-05 due to depart Singapore early the following day.

18 November 1944:
At 0645, CD-32 departs Singapore for Manila with kaibokan KURAHASHI, CD-31, and subchaser CH-56 escorting convoy SHIMA-05 consisting of MANILA, KENEI and TASMANIA MARUs, SHINSEI MARU No. 5 and tanker AYANAMI MARU and two unidentified merchant ships. At 1448 LST T-149, which departed Singapore earlier that day, joins the convoy.

20 November 1944:
The convoy arrives at Cape Datu, Borneo (now Malaysia).

21 November 1944:
The convoy departs Cape Datu.

22 November 1944:
At 0730 patrol boat PB-104 departs Singapore and joins the convoy en route.

23 November 1944:
At 1030 CH-56 comes alongside T-149 and is supplied with water.

24 November 1944:
The convoy arrives at Miri, Borneo and departs at 1710. KENEI MARU, T-149 and the unidentified merchant ship remain behind at Miri.

25 November 1944:
At 0535, LtCdr John R. Madison's (USNA ’37) USS MINGO (SS-261) torpedoes MANILA MARU and gets three hits. Loaded with ammunition and gasoline, MANILA MARU explodes and sinks in four minutes at 05-42N, 113-15E. Captain Uike Matsuichi, 96 crewmen, 51 gunners and four passengers die in the sinking. Also lost are cargo of gasoline and 10 Daihatsu barges. The escorts do not counter-attack.

29 November 1944:
At 1800 the remainder of SHIMA-05 arrives at Manila.

10 December 1944:
Reassigned to the General Escort Command’s First Escort Fleet.

December 1944:
CD-32 departs Manila for Moji escorting a convoy of unidentified ships.

19 December 1944:
CD-32 departs Yulin, Hainan Island to join the escort of convoy HI-32 enroute from Singapore to Moji.

21 December 1944:
CD-32 joins the escort of convoy HI-82 consisting of tankers OTOWASAN, OMUROSAN, ARITA, PALEMBANG and HASHIDATE MARUs escorted by destroyer USHIO, kaibokan ETOROFU, SHONAN, KUME, CD-9 and CD-19.

22 December 1944:
25 miles E of Quang Ngai, Indo-China. At 0550, OMUROSAN, OTOWASAN and ARITA MARUs are torpedoed by LtCdr George W. Grider's USS FLASHER (SS-249). All three tankers burst into flames. At 0550, after being hit amidships by two torpedoes, OMUROSAN MARU sinks at 15-02N, 109-08E. OTOWASAN and ARITA MARUs also sink. Two of the crew of OMUROSAN MARU, 62 crewmen, 56 soldiers and one passenger on OTOWASAN MARU, and 57 of ARITA MARU crew are KIA.

23 December 1944:
PALEMBANG and HASHIDATE MARUs escorted by CD-32 arrive at Yulin.

24 December 1944:
CD-32 is detached from convoy HI-82 after receiving orders to proceed to the Dangerous Ground area and investigate the wreck of USS DARTER (SS-227) abandoned there on 24 October when she grounded on Bombay Shoal. CD-32’s crew members search USS DARTER’s interior and recover some items including the submarine’s log.

Later that day, CD-32 and CD-9 joins convoy SATA-04 at Batangan Bay, Indochina consisting of YAMAMURA, DAITO, OJIKASAN, DAIRETSU and DAIAI MARUs and an unidentified ship escorted by CD-4, CD-16 and CD-46.

30 December 1944:
The convoy is about to enter Takao. but news of a possible air raid causes the convoy to be rerouted to Keelung.

31 December 1944:
Arrives at Keelung.

3 January 1945:
At 0100, departs Keelung. The convoy is now renamed TAMO-34, but is otherwise unchanged except for additional escorts; torpedo boat KIRI, subchaser CH-37 and minesweeper W-17.

4 January 1945:
The convoy suffers an air attack. Some men are injured on OJIKASAN MARU and the ship suffers minor damage from strafing.

5 January 1945:
Reassigned to 22nd Surface Escort Division with CD-8, CD-52 and CD-66.

8 January 1945:
At 2250, anchors at Fukuoka Bay.

9 January 1945:
At 0900, departs Fukuoka Bay and at 1200 arrives at Moji.

10 January 1945:
At 0700 departs Moji and at 1600 arrives at Sasebo. Undergoes repairs.

21 January 1945:
At 0820 departs Sasebo and at 1645 arrives at Moji.

24 January 1945:
At 0700 CD-32 departs Moji for Singapore with kaibokan CD-8 and CD-52 escorting convoy HI-89 consisting of NICHINAN MARU, and TATEKAWA MARU No. 2 and fleet oiler HARIO.

25 January 1945:
At 0100, the convoy anchors in Gako Bay, southern Korea.

26 January 1945:
At 0700, the convoy departs Gako Bay.

28 January 1945:
At 0800, arrives at Nayo, China coast and departs at midnight.

30 January 1945:
At about 0050, the convoy is attacked by a large bomber, but it does no damage to the convoy. During the evening the convoy arrives at Hunghai Bay (NE of Hong Kong).

31 January 1945:
At 0300, departs Hunghai Bay.

1 February 1945:
At 1900, the convoy arrives at Yulin, Hainan Island.

2 February 1945:
At 1700, departs Yulin.

3 February 1945:
At 2000 arrives at Saigon.

4 February 1945:
Ar 0700 departs Saigon.

7 February 1945:
At 2000, HARIO develops engine trouble. HARIO and CD-8 are detached.

8 February 1945:
At 1530, the convoy arrives at Singapore. HARIO and CD-8 arrive about that time or somewhat later.

15 February 1945:
At 0100, CD-32 departs Singapore for Moji, Japan with kaibokan CD-8 and CD-52 escorting convoy HI-90 consisting of EIYO and NICHINAN MARUs.

19 February 1945:
At 2200, the convoy anchors at Ca Na, southern Indo-China.

20 February 1945:
At 0800, departs Ca Na. At 0902, LtCdr Ralph H. Lockwood's (USNA ‘38) USS GUAVINA (SS-362) torpedoes EIYO MARU. Three torpedoes hit the starboard side in the vicinity of her engine room. She floods and starts to sink by the stern. At about 0930, fires break out forward as crude oil loosed into the sea catches on fire. At 1300, EIYO MARU sinks engulfed in flames at 11-55N, 109-20E, 12 miles NE of Cape Paderan light house. 27 passengers, 20 Military escorts and 33 crewmen are KIA. USS GUAVINA endures a counter-attack of ninety-eight depth-charges and incurs some damage.

NICHINAN MARU, carrying 7000 tons of aviation gasoline, quickly turns about and heads back to the Ca Na anchorage. A short while later, she sets out again. At 1324, torpedo tracks are seen coming at her from starboard and she evades them. The submarine, LtCdr (later Cdr) William H. Hazzard's (USNA ‘35) USS BLENNY (SS-324) had fired six torpedoes without getting any hits. CD-32, CD-8 and CD-52 counter-attack and drop forty-one depth-charges that cause some damage to USS BLENNY. At 1920, the convoy anchors in Van Phong Bay, Indochina.

21 February 1945:
At 0950, departs Van Phong Bay. At 1900, arrives at Quinhon Bay.

22 February 1945:
At 0715, departs Quinhon Bay.

23 February 1945:
Gulf of Tonkin. At about 1950. there is a B-24 "Liberator" heavy-bomber raid, but no damage is incurred. At 2340, the convoy arrives at a Hainan Island anchorage.

24 February 1945:
At 2330, the convoy arrives at a deep anchorage at Hainan Island.

25 February 1945:
At 0730, departs Hainan.

28 February 1945:
At 0900, the convoy arrived at the Shushan (Chusan) Island anchorage, east of Shanghai.

1 March 1945:
At 2100, departs Shushan (Chusan) Island.

3 March 1945:
At 1734, arrives at Kyosai Island.

4 March 1945:
At 0400, departs Kyosai Island and arrives safely at Moji at 1430.

5 March 1945:
At 0800 CD-8, CD-32 and CD-52 depart Moji and at 1800 arrives at Sasebo. Undergoes repairs.

19 March 1945:
At 0800 CD-8, CD-32 and CD-52 depart Sasebo.

20 March 1945:
At 1630 the escorts arrive at Moji.

21 March 1945:
At 0640 departs Moji and soon after arrives at Imari Wan. At 1500 CD-8 departs Imari Wan with kaibokan CD-32 and CD-52 and auxiliary subchaser CHa-27 in the Hosho Maru convoy consisting of tanker HOSHO MARU.

22 March 1945:
At 0800 arrives at Katoku Suido. CD-8, CD-32 and CD-52 detach at this point and kaibokan UKURU and DAITO take over.

24 March 1945:
At 0100 CD-8, CD-32 and CD-52 depart Katoku Suido escorting convoy SHIMO-01 consisting of TATSUWA, YUKIKAWA and UMEGAWA MARUs which leave nearby Chinkai at this time.

25 March 1945:
At 1550 arrives at Moji.

27 March 1945:
At 0500, arrives at Ani-Jima, Bonin Islands.

3 April 1945:
Task Force 58 planes damage CD-32 at 31-51N, 124-47E.

14 April 1945: Operation "AS-3" - Anti-submarine sweeps in the Tsushima Strait and Yellow Sea:
Off Shushan (Chusan) Archipelago. Magnetic Anomaly Detector (MAD) equipped Aichi E13A1 "Jake” and Kyushu Q1W1 "Lorna” patrol planes from the Chusan Detachment of the 951st NAG detect an Allied submarine and attack it with depth-charges. CD-32 and kaibokan OKINAWA and CD-8 are dispatched to the area and conduct several attacks between 1530 and 1558. OKINAWA makes a sonar contact with the damaged submarine and chases it for the next two hours until the contact is lost. A widening oil slick is sighted. It is possible that Cdr J.F. Walling's (USNA ‘35) USS SNOOK (SS-279) is lost in these attacks. [1]

25 April 1945:
At 1430, CD-32 departs Shishiyosan, E of Shanghai, for Moji with kaibokan CD-8 and CD-52 escorting convoy SHIMO-01 consisting of KINSEN and KIYOKAWA MARUs.

E 28 April 1945:
Tsushima Strait. CD-34 joins the escort of convoy SHIMO-02.

29 April 1945:
At 0720, CD-32 is detached from the convoy. At 1430,the convoy arrives at Moji.

9 July 1945:
Arrives at Ominato. Commences anti-submarine patrols in Tsugaru Strait area.

10 July 1945:
Reserve LtCdr Taguchi Takashi (former CO of CD-142) is appointed CO.

15 August 1945:
Japan accepts the Allies “Potsdam Declaration” (of unconditional surrender) and hostilities cease.

18 August 1945:
CD-32 arrives at Sasebo where she is subsequently demilitarized.

5 October 1945:
Removed from the Navy List.

1 December 1945:
Officially assigned to the Allied Repatriation Service. [2]

17 October 1945:
Departs Sasebo.

19 October 1945:
Arrives at Ishigaki Shima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

20 October 1945:
Departs Ishigaki Shima.

23 October 1945:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

3 November 1945:
Departs Sasebo.

6 November 1945:
Arrives at Ishigaki Shima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

7 November 1945:
Departs Ishigaki Shima.

10 November 1945:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

20 November 1945:
Undergoes repair at Ishikawajima's yard.

19 December 1945:
Repairs are completed.

26 December 1945:
Departs Uraga.

30 December 1945:
Arrives at Miyako Shima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

3 January 1946:
Departs Miyako Shima.

5 January 1946:
Arrives at Ishigaki Shima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

6 January 1946:
Departs Ishigaki Shima.

9 January 1946:
Arrives at Kagoshima. Disembarks troops and passengers.

16 January 1946:
Departs Hakata.

18 January 1946:
Arrives at Pusan. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

19 January 1946:
Departs Pusan.

21 January 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

24 January 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

27 January 1946:
Departs Hakata.

28 January 1946:
Arrives at Pusan. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

30 January 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

2 February 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

4 February 1946:
Undergoes repair at Nagasaki.

10 April 1946:
Repairs are completed.

11 April 1946:
Departs Nagasaki.

13 April 1946:
Arrives at Shanghai. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

18 April 1946:
Departs Shanghai.

21 April 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

22 April 1946:
Departs Hakata.

23 April 1946:
Arrives at Pusan. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

24 April 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers and departs later that day.

25 April 1946:
Arrives at Pusan. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

26 April 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

29 April 1946:
Departs Hakata.

1 May 1946:
Arrives at Korojima near Tsientsin. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

13 May 1946:
Departs Korojima.

16 May 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

22 May 1946:
Departs Hakata.

25 May 1946:
Arrives at Korojima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

26 May 1946:
Departs Korojima.

29 May 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

3 June 1946:
Departs Hakata.

5 June 1946:
Arrives at Korojima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

10 June 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

21 June 1946:
Undergoes repairs at Sasebo.

30 June 1946:
Repairs are completed.

1 July 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

4 July 1946:
Arrives at Korojima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

5 July 1946:
Departs Korojima.

8 July 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

13 July 1946:
Departs Hakata.

16 July 1946:
Arrives at Korojima. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

17 July 1946:
Departs Korojima.

20 July 1946:
Arrives at Hakata. Disembarks troops and passengers.

25 July 1946:
Undergoes repairs at Wakamatsu.

8 August 1946:
Repairs are completed.

29 September 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

1 October 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

3 October 1946:
Departs Okinawa.

5 October 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

10 October 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

12 October 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

13 October 1946:
Departs Okinawa.

15 October 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

17 October 1946:
Departs Hakata.

19 October 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

22 October 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

30 October 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

1 November 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa and departs later that day.

3 November 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

13 November 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

15 November 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated.

16 November 1946:
Departs Okinawa.

18 November 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

23 November 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

25 November 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

27 November 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

8 December 1946:
Departs Sasebo.

9 December 1946:
Arrives at Okinawa. Embarks troops and passengers to be repatriated and departs later that day.

10 December 1946:
Arrives at Sasebo. Disembarks troops and passengers.

16 July 1947:
Ceded to the United Kingdom as a war reparation.

1947-1948:
Scrapped.


Authors' Note:
[1] The cause of the loss of USS SNOOK, or even its sinking location, have never been officially determined.

[2] Allied occupation forces were responsible for the return of six million Japanese military personnel and civilians from Japan's defunct far-flung Empire. In addition, there were over a million Korean and about 40,000 Chinese prisoners and conscript laborers and approximately 7,000 Formosans and 15,000 Ryukyu Islanders to be repatriated.

Some Allied and many former IJN warships, from aircraft carriers to kaibokan, were used to facilitate the enormous repatriation effort. Japanese vessels and crews were used to the fullest extent possible to conserve Allied manpower and accelerate demobilization. Each ex-IJN ship first had to be demilitarized; guns removed or, in the case of large warships, barrels severed, ammunition landed, and radar and catapults removed, if fitted. Repatriation of the Chinese on Japanese ships began early in October from Hakata, but U.S. guard detachments had to be placed on many ships to prevent disorder because the Japanese crews could not control the returnees.

Japanese-run repatriation centers were established at Kagoshima, Hario near Sasebo, and Hakata near Fukuoka. Other reception centers were established and operated at Maizuru, Shimonoseki, Sasebo, Senzaki, Kure, Uraga, Yokohama, Moji and Hakodate. Allied line and medical personnel supervised the centers. Incoming Japanese were sprayed with DDT, examined and inoculated for typhus and smallpox, provided with food, and transported to his final destination in Japan.

Thanks for assistance go to Mr. Gilbert Casse of France. Special thanks also go to Hans Mcilveen of the Netherlands for research based on wartime FRUMEL intercepts.

-Bob Hackett and Peter Cundall


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